Testing? or Tempting?
by Ronald W Ronald Ward Robey
 
Venom: In Malachi 3:10, God tells us to test Him by giving Him tithes of our monetary income to the Church.
 
Anti-Venom: God never told us to test Him in the tithe. He was speaking to the Priest’s of Israel in Malachi 3:10, not to the New Covenant Church.
 
Further, since God said His tithe was to come from agricultural produce, (Lev. 27:30-33) not from monetary income, one may be tempting God rather than testing God when one tithes money.
 
Consider the many illnesses that fall on families who have tithed faithfully for years. I personally knew a woman who tithed faithfully for more than 50 years of her life, yet she took sick with the flu at least once a year; suffered a broken back; suffered a broken hip, was diagnosed with cancer and died.
 
Deuteronomy 28:15-68 promises many “curses” for those who are under the Law who do not keep the Law. Whether one realizes it or not, one is placing oneself under the Law when one uses the Malachi 3:10 argument for tithing.
 
How can I say this? Because Malachi lived under the Mosaic Law. The Mosaic Law was established in 1450 BC, and was in still in effect when the Book of Hebrews. (see Hebrews 7:5-9)
 
The Mosaic Law states that God’s holy tithe was to be agricultural, not monetary. (Read Leviticus 27:30-33) The Mosaic Law further says that man could not do what seemed right in his own eyes. (Read Deuteronomy 12:8. This same chapter identifies God’s tithe as being agricultural products, not monetary income)
 
Since Malachi was living under the Mosaic Law, he would have been telling people to sin had he told them to tithe their monetary income. Further, had he told them to tithe that which God did not want tithed, he himself would have been tempting God.
 
When pastors use Malachi 3:10, or any other verse from the Bible that commands tithing, to convince members of their congregations to tithe their monetary income, they are tempting God.
 
Monetary tithe exist because of lies from the pulpit and ignorance in the pews.
 
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